Menu
FM Ashkenazi meets with Cypriot FM Nikos Christodoulides

FM Ashkenazi meets with Cypriot FM …

FM Ashkenazi: Israel and ...

MFA hosts virtual conference on digital diplomacy during the corona crisis

MFA hosts virtual conference on dig…

Some 150 participants wil...

PM Netanyahu chairs Corona Cabinet meeting

PM Netanyahu chairs Corona Cabinet …

The goal of the policy is...

Israel marks Memorial Day for the fallen soldiers and victims of terrorism

Israel marks Memorial Day for the f…

Remembrance Day, Yom Hazi...

President Rivlin and FM Katz host reception for the diplomatic and consular corps in Israel

President Rivlin and FM Katz host r…

President Rivlin: Althoug...

Special Holy Fire ceremony held during the coronavirus outbreak

Special Holy Fire ceremony held dur…

The traditional Holy Fire...

PM Netanyahu addresses the ceremony marking Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Day

PM Netanyahu addresses the ceremony…

Prime Minister Benjamin N...

Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Day 20-21 April 2020

Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Reme…

The official Opening Cere...

Briefing for foreign ambassadors on Coronavirus management and cooperation with the Palestinians

Briefing for foreign ambassadors on…

During the briefing, the ...

Yad L'Achim Opens Hotline for Assistance from Experienced Psychologists, Social Workers

Yad L'Achim Opens Hotline for Assis…

Confused? Under Pressure?...

Prev Next
A+ A A-

German Jewish leader: Burial of Nazi secret police chief in Jewish cemetery 'a terrible iniquity'

WJC, Heinrich Müller, the notorious head of the Nazi secret police Gestapo, was buried in a Jewish cemetery in central Berlin, the German newspaper 'Bild' reports, citing Johannes Tuchel, the director of the Memorial German Resistance. Tuchel told the newspaper that according to new documents found in different archives, Müller was interred in 1945, in the last days of the war, in a mass grave of the Jewish cemeteryBerlin-Mitte. It is apparently unclear why the prominent Nazi was buried there.
Contrary to the belief held by Western intelligence agencies, Müller did not survive the war, Tuchel said. "Müller's corpse was found in August 1945 near the former Reich Ministry for Aviation", he told 'Bild'. According to documents, the body was clearly identified at the time and Müller was wearing the uniform of a general in which his Gestapo pass bearing a photo of him was discovered. In 1963, a gravedigger told police that he had buried Müller personally, and that he had seen Müller's face. While his statement was not confirmed at the time, it turns out now that he was telling the truth.
Müller became Gestapo chief in 1939 under Reinhard Heydrich, and was involved in the planning and execution of the Holocaust. Adolf Eichmann, who headed the Gestapo's office of resettlement and the Office of Jewish Affairs, was Müller's immediate subordinate. Once World War II began, Müller and Eichmann planned key components in the deportation and then extermination of Europe's Jews. Müller was last seen in Hitler's bunker in Berlin on 1 May 1945 and has so far been the most senior figure of the Nazi regime who was never captured or confirmed to have died.
Dieter Graumann, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany and a vice-president of the World Jewish Congress, called the discovery that Müller was buried in a Jewish graveyard "horrific". Graumann said: "That one of the most brutal Nazi sadists is buried in a Jewish cemetery, of all places, is a terrible iniquity."

Read more...

Sydney: Five injured in worst anti-Semitic attack in Australia's recent history

WJC, The Executive Council of Australian Jewry (ECAJ) has called for Australia's anti-racism strategy to be strengthened following the worst anti-Semitic attack in recent history. A group of eight young men attacked families who were walking home from a synagogue in Sydney late on Friday after Shabbat services.
The group allegedly yelled racial slurs at the families before the confrontation turned into a physical fight. Four men and a woman were injured and taken to hospital for treatment. One man aged in his 60s suffered a bleed on the brain, others suffered broken bones.
ECAJ Executive Director Peter Wertheim said the authorities needed to be more proactive to ensure racism is kept in check. He called for the national anti-racism strategy to be strengthened and included in the education curriculum.
Police have charged three people over the assault, which happened in the Bondi area of Sydney. Two 17-year-olds were both charged with affray and breach of bail. They are due to appear in Sydney Children's Court on Sunday. A 23-year-old man was also charged with affray and granted bail. Police are still looking for five others who ran away.
Wertheim said in a statement: “I grew up in Bondi and never experienced a single incident of anti-Semitism, not even verbal. For decades, Bondi has been famous for its relaxed, free-wheeling and culturally diverse way of life. Many Jewish people live there. There are numerous shuls, kosher eateries, a kosher butcher, kosher bakeries, kosher grocery stores and Jewish communal institutions. It is not uncommon to see men walking along the street wearing kippot or Chasidic garb, often strolling with their families. Sometimes they are the objects of verbal abuse, but violence is rare. Last night’s violence was exceptional.”

Read more...

Around 400 young Jews gathered in St. Petersburg, Russia for the Limmud FSU Conference

Jewish News, St. Petersburg, Russia, Around 400 young Jews from across St. Petersburg came together at the New Peterhof Hotel, near St. Petersburg, Russia over this past weekend, October 25-27, for the Limmud FSU (former Soviet Union) Conference. St. Petersburg is the second largest Jewish community in Russia today, and it counts around 100,000 Jewish residents (according to the Israeli law of return). Limmud FSU is a festival of Jewish learning featuring a packed program of lectures, workshops, round-table discussions, music and a wide-range of cultural events. 

During the three-day conference, participants coming primarily from St. Petersburg, but also from many other neighboring countries and cities (like Moscow, Kaliningrad, Saratov, Belarus, Ukraine), attended some 80 seminars, lectures, presentations, master-classes, round-table discussions and creative workshops on a wide variety of topics. Some of the topics included: Jewish spirituality and philosophy, ethical issues, current topics in politics and society, Bible and Talmud, arts, music, and dance. Among the presenters will be prominent historians, scientists, artists, politicians, businessmen, educators and musicians mainly from St. Petersburg, Moscow, Israel and America. Some of the exciting names at this year’s conference included famous Israeli actress Helena Yaralova who is originally from Kiev, well known poet and philosopher Lev Rubinstein from Moscow, children’s author Michael Yasnov, historian Ilya Altman from Moscow, and fashion designer Liliana Modigliani. Also in attendance was the Israeli Consul General in St. Petersburg, Ambassador Eddie Shapira.

Like all other Limmud conferences, Limmud FSU in St. Petersburg is egalitarian and pluralistic. The conferences are organized and run entirely by local volunteers who are passionate and enthusiastic about the Limmud mission of strengthening Jewish identity and bringing Jewish learning to Jews of all backgrounds.

Under the reign of Alexander II in the 19th Century select groups of Jews gained legal access to the Russian interior, including the imperial capital. Under the policy of selective integration, “useful” Jews, such as, physicians, army veterans, university graduates, and wealthy merchants, were permitted to live outside the Pale of Settlement. By the end of Alexander II’s reign, approximately 16,000 Jews lived in St. Petersburg legally, making it the largest Jewish community outside the Pale. There are estimates that an almost equal number of Jews were living in the city illegally at the time as well. According to the 1897 census there were 17,254 Jews in St. Petersburg (including 310 Karaites), constituting 1.4% of the population. Despite its small numbers, the St. Petersburg Jewish community played an important role in Russian Jewish life, in part due to the wealth of individual members and their influence at the court.

In 1917, all residence restrictions on Jews, which had allowed only Jews who worked in St. Petersburg to remain there, were abolished, and the city became a center of the organizational activities of all the factions and parties of Russian Jewry. However, there remained periods of pronounced anti-Semitism. Though mass emigration in the 1980s-90s reduced St. Petersburg’s Jewish population, the city re-emerged as a vibrant Jewish community after the fall of Communism, with a full range of educational and religious facilities, including a Chabad House and synagogues, Jewish private University, five day schools, Reform synagogue, many JCCs, and large range of international and local organizations, such as the Israeli Consulate General, Israeli cultural center, JAFI, JDC, Hillel, Family Center "Adain Lo" and many others.

“St. Petersburg has one of the most vibrant and flourishing Jewish communities in Eastern Europe and we are thrilled to be part of it”, said Chaim Chesler, founder of Limmud FSU. “We are sure that this conference, like all other Limmud FSU conferences, contributed to the Jewish life in the city and will leave a significant impact on the Jewish community members while they are looking to strengthen their Jewish identity.”


Read more...

Jewish Museums around the Globe

  • Published in Travel
Country

City

Museum

Phone

Argentina

Buenos Aires

Museo Historico Comunal y de la Colonizacion Judia

54.3409.420665

Australia

Darlinghurst

Sydney Jewish Museum

61.2.9360.7999

Australia

Victoria

Jewish Museum of Australia

61.3.9534.0083

Austria

Eisenstadt

Austrian Jewish Museum

43.26.826.5145

Austria

Hohenems

Judisches Museum Hohenems

43.55.767.3989

Austria

Vienna

Jewish Museum Vienna - Judisches Museum der Stadt Wien

43.1.535.0431

Belarus

Vitebsk

Marc Chagall Museum

375.212.372737

Belgium

Brussels

Jewish Museum of Belgium

32.2.512.1963

Canada

New Brunswick

Saint John Jewish Museum

1.506.633.1833

Canada

Toronto

Jewish Canadian Military Museum

1.905.640.0500

Canada

Vancouver, BC

Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia

1.604.257.5199

Canada

Winnipeg

Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada

1.204.477.7460

Czech Rep.

Prague

Jewish Museum in Prague

420.224.819456

Denmark

Copenhagen

Danish Jewish Museum - Dansk Jodisk Museum

45.33112218

France

Bouxwiller

Musee Judeo-Alsacien de Bouxwiller

33.3. 8870.9717

France

Paris

Museum of Jewish Art and History - Musee d'Art et d'Histoire du Judaisme

33.1.5301.8660

Germany

Augsburg

Judisches Kulturmuseum

49.821.513658

Germany

Berlin

Jewish Museum Berlin - Judisches Museum

49.30.878.5681

Germany

Berlin

Neue Synagoge Berlin - Centrum Judaicum

49.30.8802.8451

Germany

Buttenheim

Levi Strauss Museum

49.9545.442602

Germany

Creglingen

Creglingen Jewish Museum

49.79.337010

Germany

Dorsten

Jewish Museum of Westphalia - Judisches Museum Westfalen

49.23.6245279

Germany

Emmendingen

Judisches Museum Emmendingen

49.76.4157.4444

Germany

Frankfurt

Jewish Museum Frankfurt - Judische Museum

49.69.212.35000

Germany

Furth

Jewish Museum of Franconia

49.911.770577

Germany

Goppingen

Jewish Museum in Jebenhausen

 

Germany

Munich

Judisches Museum Munchen

49.89.233.25388

Germany

Munich

Association of European Jewish Museums

 

Germany

Rendsburg

Judische Museum Rendsburg

49.4331.25262

Greece

Athens

Jewish Museum of Greece

30.10.322.5582

Greece

Crete

Etz Hayyim Synagogue, Hania

30.282.108.6286

Greece

Thessaloniki

Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

30.2310.250406

Hungary

Budapest

Hungarian Jewish Museum and Archives

36.1.343.6756

Ireland

Dublin

Irish-Jewish Museum

353.1.490.1857

Israel

 

Directory of Museums in Israel

 

Italy

Bologna

Jewish Museum of Bologna - Museo Ebraica di Bologna

39.051.291.1280

Italy

Ferrara

Museo Ebraico di Ferrara

39.532.210228

Italy

Florence

Jewish Museum of Florence - Museo Ebraico di Firenze

39.055.234.6654

Italy

Livorno

Jewish Museum of Leghorn

39.058.683.9772

Italy

Rome

Jewish Museum of Rome - Museo Ebraico di Roma

39.066.840.0662

Italy

Soragna

Jewish Museum of Soragna - Museo Ebraico di Soragna

39.0524.599399

Italy

Venice

Jewish Museum of Venice - Museo Ebraico di Venezia

39.041.715359

Latvia

Riga

"Jews in Latvia" Museum

371.6728.3484

Lithuania

Vilnius

Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum

370.5.212.7912

Mexico

 

Museo Historico Judio Y del Holocausto

5211.6908

Netherlands

Amsterdam

Jewish Historical Museum - Joods Historisch Museum

31.20.626.9945

Norway

Oslo

Oslo Jewish Museum - Jodisk Museum

47.2220.8400

Poland

Krakow

Galicia Jewish Museum

48.12.4216842

Poland

Krakow

Old Synagogue - Stara Synagoga

48.12.6192300

Poland

Warszawa

Jewish Historical Institute

48.22.8279221

Poland

Warszawa

Museum of the History of Polish Jews

48.22.833.0021

Russia

Moscow

Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center

7.495.645.0550

Slovakia

Bratislava

Museum of Jewish Culture, Slovak Jewish Heritage

421.2.5934.9142

South Africa

Cape Town

South African Jewish Museum

27.21.465.1546

Spain

 

Red de Judeira - Network of Spanish Jewish Quarters

34.972.414146

Spain

Cordoba

House of Sepharad - Casa de Sefarad

34.957.421404

Spain

Toledo

Museo Sefardi

34.92522.3665

Sweden

Stockholm

Jewish Museum in Stockholm

46.8.310143

Turkey

Istanbul

Jewish Museum of Turkey

90.212.292.6333

U.K.

Glasgow

Scottish Jewish Archives Centre

44.141.332.4911

U.K.

London

Ben Uri Gallery, Jewish Museum of Art

44.20.7604.3991

U.K.

London

Jewish Museum

44.20.8349.1143

U.K.

Manchester

Manchester Jewish Museum

44.161.834.9879

Ukraine

Odessa

Jewish Museum of Odessa

38.048.728.9743

USA

 

Jewish-American Hall of Fame

1.818.225.1348

USA

Anchorage, AK

Alaska Jewish Historical Museum

1.907.770.7021

USA

Atlanta, GA

Jewish Heritage Museum

1.404.870.7684

USA

Baltimore, MD

Jewish Museum of Maryland

1.410.732.6400

USA

Beachwood, OH

Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage

1.216.593.0575

USA

Berkeley, CA

Magnes Museum

1.510.549.6950

USA

Beverly Hills, CA

Center for Iranian Jewish Oral History

1.310.472.3012

USA

Boca Raton, FL

Builders of America - The Jewish Heritage - A traveling exhibit

 

USA

Denver, CO

Council of American Jewish Museums

303.871.3015

USA

Denver, CO

Mizel Museum of Judaica

1.303.394.9993

USA

Jackson, MS

Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience

1.601.362.6357

USA

Los Angeles

Rhodes Jewish Museum

1.310.475.4779

USA

Los Angeles

Skirball Cultural Center

1.310.440.4500

USA

Miami Beach

Jewish Museum of Florida

1.305.672.5044

USA

New York

Yeshiva University Museum

1.212.294.8330

USA

New York

Jewish Museum

1.212.423.3200

USA

New York

Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue and Museum

1.516.221.2712

USA

New York, NY

Jewish Children's Museum

1.718.467.0600

USA

New York, NY

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

1.212.246.6080

USA

Newark, NJ

Jewish Museum of New Jersey

1.973.227.8854

USA

Philadelphia

National Museum of American Jewish History

1.215.923.3811

USA

Portland, OR

Oregon Jewish Museum

1.503.226.3600

USA

San Francisco

Contemporary Jewish Museum

1.415.655.7800

USA

Tulsa, OK

Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art

1.918.492.1818

USA

Washington, DC

National Museum of American Jewish Military History

1.202.265.6280

USA

Washington, DC

B'nai B'rith National Jewish Museum

1.202.857.6647

USA

Woodbine, NJ

Sam Azeez Museum of Woodbine Heritage

1.609.861.5355

Venezuela

Caracas

Museo Sefaradi de Caracas

58.212.578.1489

Read more...

The North African Jewish heritage

The Worldwide North Africa Jewish Heritage Center in Jerusalem exhibits the culture that is common to the Muslims and to the Jews of North Africa, while the Israeli Andalusian Orchestra Ashdod creates a connecting link between Jews and Arabs. 

Jerusalem, The Worldwide North Africa Jewish Heritage Center, established in 1854 by Rabbi David Ben Shimon, is located in the Mughrabi neighborhood of Jerusalem, known also as Mamilla, in the center of a stunning garden with authentic Moroccan design.

The Center offers exhibitions showing the extraordinary history and heritage of the Jews communities of North Africa. The crown of the center is an audio-visual presentation, that include documents, movies, music, bibliography, and pictures telling the thrilling narrative of the Jewish communities in Morocco, Algeria and Tunis.

Andalusian music arrived in Israel with the immigrants from North Africa in the late 1950s and early 60s. The Israel Andalusian Orchestra founded in Ashdod includes both musicians trained in Western classical music and musicians playing traditional instruments, including the oud, the mandolin and the darbuka.

The Israeli Andalusian Orchestra was the first in the world to apply Western musical notation to ancient Andalusian music, to document and record this centuries-old music in new orchestral arrangements. In 2006, the orchestra was awarded the Israel Prize, for its lifetime achievement and special contribution to Israeli society.

Read more...

“Jew in the City” Announces Top 10 Orthodox Jewish All Stars of 2013

The Jew in the City Second Annual “Top 10 Orthodox Jewish All Stars” Awardees and Red Carpet event will take place on Sunday, November 24th in New York City 

New York, NY, U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and Nobel Laureate Robert Aumann are among ten individuals who have been named 2013 Orthodox Jewish All Stars by Jew in the City, the organization dedicated to re-branding Orthodox Jews and Judaism to the world through digital media.

This year's All Stars are an extremely accomplished and diverse group, and, in addition to Secretary Lew and Dr. Aumann, include: Sarah Hofstetter, who was promoted last week to CEO of 360i in the US (the No. 2 advertising firm on Ad Age's Agency A-List); Ari Pinchot, co-executive producer of the star-studded and critically acclaimed new film, Lee Daniels' The Butler, featuring Forest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey; Naama Shafir, the first Orthodox female professional basketball player; Joseph Shenker, chairman of Sullivan and Cromwell (the No. 3 law firm in the country according to Vault Rankings); Rama Burshtein, writer, director and producer of the awarding-winning film, Fill the Void (and the first Hasidic woman to make a film for general audiences); Anne Neuberger, the Director of the National Security Agency's Commercial Solutions Center; Issamar Ginzberg, a marketing guru who was named one of Inc. Magazine's Top 10 Entrepreneurs (and is the grandson of prominent Hasidic rebbes); and Dr. Laurel Steinherz, Director of Pediatric Cardiology at Memorial Sloan Kettering and co-founder of Camp Simcha, a renowned camp for Jewish children with cancer.

This year's winners will be honored at a red carpet event which will coincide with a historic, once-in-a-lifetime overlap of Chanukah and Thanksgiving and will commemorate the redemption from religious persecution of Chanukah coinciding with Thanksgiving's celebration of religious freedom in our great country, which has provided Jews with the opportunity to achieve the highest levels of professional success while maintaining their heritage.

“There is a common misconception that being an Orthodox Jew means you don't have many career options,” said Allison Josephs, award-winning Jewish influencer and author, who founded Jew in the City (JewintheCity.com) six years ago to break down myths and misconceptions about religious Jews and observant Judaism. “Jew in the City is building awareness about a community that otherwise gets depicted as extreme and reclusive, and rarely is presented with any nuance."

The inaugural "Orthodox Jewish All Stars" began last year with a YouTube video written, directed, and produced by Josephs that featured an inspiring and varied group of awardees, including former Senator Joe Lieberman, Top Ten Billboard Recording Artist Alex Clare and NYTimes bestselling novelist, Faye Kellerman - all people who have reached the pinnacle of their respective fields, which ranged from HBO producer to former top title holding professional boxer - while maintaining a religiously observant lifestyle.

Many of this year's and last year's All Stars will be attending the red carpet awards party in midtown Manhattan on the evening of November 24, the Sunday night before Chanukah and Thanksgiving. Attendees will enjoy live music, an open wine bar, and Chanukah/Thanksgiving themed dishes.

"For last year's list, we sought out the individuals ourselves. This year, we opened up nominations to the public and a panel of judges selected the winners,” explained Josephs. “There were so many more remarkably successful Orthodox Jews that didn't make it to this year's list; we'll hopefully be doing this for many more years."


Josephs was named one of the Jewish Week's 36 Under 36 in 2013 and one of NJOP's Top Ten Jewish Influencers in 2012. She has been studying Torah with actress Mayim Bialik since 2004 and is often quoted in the media on issues relating to Jewish life and observance. Josephs provides Orthodox Jewish Cultural Diversity training to top corporations such as Con Edison and NYU Langone Medical Center and also gives inspirational lectures across North America. She has been featured or published in The Wall Street Journal, The Daily Beast, Yahoo News, the Jewish Press, and The Forward, among other publications. Josephs, who is married with four children, has been involved in the field of Jewish education and outreach for over a dozen years, and received her Bachelor of Arts from Columbia University in Philosophy.

Jew in the City, founded and directed by Josephs, harnesses the power of social media to break down stereotypes about religious Jews and offer a humorous, meaningful look into Orthodox Judaism. Through a website JewintheCity, YouTube channel (where its videos that have been viewed over a million times), and via Facebook and Twitter Jew in the City explains important Jewish concepts like Shabbat, keeping kosher, and mikvah, and tackles difficult topics like the Orthodox Jewish approach to homosexuality, feminism, and conversion. With a mix of light humor and rich content, Jew in the City explores these topics in a pleasant and easy to understand fashion, appealing to anyone who is curious to learn more about Orthodox Jews and observant Judaism, whether Jewish or not.

“Unfortunately, most non-Orthodox Jews and non-Jews have a very negative perception of Orthodox Jews and Judaism,” said Josephs. “When they think of Orthodoxy, they think things like backwards, repressed, outdated, sexist, and anti-scientific. Scandals that reinforce these misconceptions hit the papers all too often. Popular movies, books, and TV shows repeat negative stereotypes about religious Jewish people and their lifestyles, which make it even harder to counteract these negative stereotypes. Jew in the City was created to break down those misconceptions and stereotypes.”

Read more...

ZOA: Iran President Rouhani’s Boasting of Deceiving West on Iran’s Nuclear Weapons Program Underscores the Fraudulence of his Moderate Image

The Zionist Organization of America (ZOA) has drawn attention to new Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s boasting in an Iranian television interview of having played an instrumental role in Iranian deception on its nuclear weapons program over the years. This is but the latest addition to Rouhani’s long record of extremism, deception on nuclear weapons and involvement in mass casualty acts of Iranian terrorism against Jews, which the ZOA outlined in July when he was elected president. It also demonstrates that his image as a moderate is fraudulent.
Speaking on Iran’s state IRIB TV (Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting) on May 27, in response to the interviewer’s challenge that, as Iran’s chief nuclear negotiator in 2003-5, “everything was suspended” on Iran’s nuclear program, Rouhani said this was “a lie” and proceeded to explain that Iran, in fact, had actually breached its international commitments. Rouhani said that Iran had systematically violated its commitments under the Iran-European Union October 2003 Tehran Declaration, which committed Iran to verifiably suspending its nuclear program. He said proudly, “We did not let that happen!”
Far from honoring the commitment, in which Iran said “it has decided voluntarily to suspend all uranium enrichment and reprocessing activities,” Rouhani told the interviewer that all Iran did was merely suspend “ten centrifuges” in its Natanz enrichment facility and that it was “not a total suspension. Just reduced the yield.” When challenged that enrichment had been suspended at its Isfahan plant, Rouhani repudiated this claim, too, saying that work had continued in Isfahan on his watch during 2004-5 as had also the development of the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak. “Do you know when we developed yellowcake? Winter 2004 … Do you know when the number of centrifuges reached 3,000? Winter 2004 … We halted the nuclear program? We were the ones to complete it! We completed the technology” (‘Rouhani, on Iranian TV in May, detailed how he broke nuclear pledge,’ Times of Israel, October 6, 2013).
ZOA National President Morton A. Klein said, “As we already argued when Rouhani was elected in July, we cannot expect moderation or honesty from him on the nuclear front.
“Even if Rouhani really was a moderate who somehow managed to be approved to run in the presidential elections by the Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khameni and the Guardian Council that actually hold the keys of power in Tehran, Iranian policy would still be in their hands, not Rouhani’s.
“But in any case, as he now plainly boasted with satisfaction, Rouhani was Iran’s chief nuclear negotiator at the time Iran was concealing from the world its clandestine nuclear weapons program and taking the essential steps –– not to develop a peaceful, civilian, nuclear energy program ––but a nuclear weapons program.
“As we have argued before, it is therefore imperative that there is not the slightest weakening of sanctions and other forms of international pressure on the Iranian regime. The only chance of stopping Iran’s nuclear weapons program by non-military means –– a slender chance at best –– is to increase, not decrease, pressure on Tehran.”

Read more...

WJC ANALYSIS - Carmen Matussek: The Protocols of the Elders of Zion in the Arab world

The following article was first published in the 'Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs', a publication of the Israel Council on Foreign Relations, which operates under the auspices of the World Jewish Congress
The Protocols of the Elders of Zion — what are they?
Whoever begins to explore the phenomenon of anti-Semitism soon encounters this most influential anti-Semitic fabrication of the last century. Anyone concerned about the big lie of a so-called Jewish global conspiracy knows about this pamphlet, which is said to be proof of the intrigues of “the Jews,” allegedly penned by the Jews themselves. But if one leaves the circle of the informed public, one does not have to go far afield to find people who have never heard of the Protocols — or who assess them in a totally different way.
Seventy years ago the Protocols were a bestseller in Germany. Today they are hardly remembered.
Section 130 of the German Criminal Code deems these writings inflammatory, so people abide by the rules, do not read the Protocols, and do not care. The booklet is not well known in political circles, churches, or universities.
Seemingly, the only ones who are familiar with it are a handful of anti-German left-wing activists, whose ideas a non-Marxist might not understand, but whose penetrating and profound statements concerning Israel are made loud and clear, even if they are often disregarded.
There is another place you can find the Protocols: at the annual Frankfurt Book Fair, delivered by the Iranians in English, or inside several mosques in Turkish or Arabic translation, as the Office for the Protection of the Constitution confirms.
The situation is similar in other parts of Europe. An Arabic edition of the Protocols (one of many), published in Egypt in 2002 by the large publishing house Akhbar al-Youm, contains a list of thirty-seven countries to which it is exported, including Germany, Great Britain, France, and the United States.
In Germany, prosecution for the dissemination of the inflammatory booklet proves to be less frequent if it is in Arabic, Turkish, or Farsi. This special dispensation for incitement is not without consequences. In the face of an unending series of violent attacks on Jewish citizens, often committed by youth with a Muslim background, Europe should at least demonstrate some interest in what lies behind this phenomenon.
Instead of approaching the subject as earnestly as possible, there has been much effort expended on the denial of the problem. For the last three years, confronted with the release of some relevant studies and even more violent incidents, Muslim anti-Semitism has garnered more attention. But too often it is interpreted as a reaction to the discrimination Muslims suffer.
Most Germans and probably most Europeans do not know (and do not want to know) that Mein Kampf is a bestseller in the Arab world today. They regard the friendly salute of a taxi driver in Egypt and the words “Heil Hitler” as meaningless exceptions. What, then, should be made of the proliferation of Arabic-language editions of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion?
The Protocols in the Arab world
The popularity of the Protocols in the Arab world is not at all limited to Islamist circles. The belief in a Jewish world conspiracy characterizes the general historical and political consciousness in much of the Middle East. However, the main reason for this is not the reference to the Protocols in Section 32 of the Hamas Charter or other extremist propaganda.
The Jews’ responsibility for every evil on earth is, rather, a very common, academic, and centrist world view in Arab nations.
The Protocols are translated, commented upon, published, and promoted by famous Arab intellectuals, politicians, and professors. They introduce the Protocols as an authentic document and as absolutely essential in explaining world affairs.
The Lebanese politician Ajjaj Nuwayhid (1897–1982) published an Arabic translation of the Protocols that is still among the most famous editions. In the foreword to the fourth edition, he quoted Said Aql, one of Lebanon’s most important modern poets: “Before the publishing [of the Protocols] Israel could be seen as a mere military danger, but now it has become a cultural and metaphysical danger.”
Whether the Protocols were authentic or not was a question of little or no significance: “In this period of history in the Middle East no one who has not read your [Nuwayhid’s] book should be entrusted with politics.”
Nuwayhid’s translation has been reprinted by many publishing houses in different Arab countries. Most editions of the Protocols include the following blurb:
• Oh, you may not stop halfway, my dear Arab, as it is your duty to know most certainly what and who is “International Jewry,” working toward the devastation of Christianity, Islam, and all of civilization.
• If you stop halfway you are harming yourself, your Umma, your history and your present and future descendants.
• Do not be deceived by what you have known until now about 'Zionism' and 'Israel'. It is important for you to know the 'international Jewry' that is behind the scenes and that has performed its criminal deeds for twenty centuries.
• 'Zionism' and 'Israel' are nothing but its facade. Read these Protocols!
This invitation is often combined with a warning to the reader to exercise caution in dealing with the Protocols; purportedly, no translator or publisher of this tome has ever died of natural causes: To the reader: Take care of this copy, as the Jews fought this book wherever it appeared and in every language.
They appear, no matter what the cost, in order to collect and burn the copies, because they do not want the world to know about the hellish plots they have made against it. In this book they [the plots] are revealed.
One often reads that the real object of the Arabs’ struggle did not appear for the first time in 1948 (i.e. with the creation of the State of Israel) or in the late nineteenth century with the emergence of Zionism, but rather that “International Jewry” has been a threat to mankind throughout the ages.
The first Arabic translation of the Protocols to gain mainstream fame was the one by Muhammad Khalifa at-Tunisi, first published in 1951. It is still reprinted today and is also available on the internet.
At-Tunisi explained why he translated the Protocols: I do not warn against the [Jewish] danger because they are fighting against my people; and not because they carved Israel out of Palestine and in so doing, became a neighboring enemy; and not because they are situated right in the midst of our own countries. But I warn against their danger to mankind, too. Even if all of that belongs to my motives for paying attention to this danger, I still warn against their danger to mankind. Even if they were expelled from our countries to any spot of land—wherever they were, they were enemies to mankind.
At-Tunisi’s translation is supplemented with a benevolent foreword by the great Egyptian liberal writer Abbas Mahmud al-Aqqad. The foreword to the English translation by Victor Marsden is also reprinted there in Arabic, as well as that of Sergej Nilus, the Orthodox mystic who first published the Protocols in Russia in 1905. This creates the impression that people all over the world are all aware of the “Jewish peril.”
Most Arabic editions of the Protocols contain much more than just the text of the fabrication. The above-mentioned 1996 edition of Nuwayhid’s translation has about 600 pages, of which the Protocols themselves account for less than 100.
The rest is pseudoscientific material, forewords of older Arabic or foreign editions, and articles by other so-called “scholars and experts.” But the fact is that they are mostly well-educated people. It is frightening to observe that blatant anti-Semitism and progressive, higher education are not mutually exclusive.
Nuwayhid adds to his translation an analysis of the Old Testament. It is not unusual for the Protocols to be placed in the context of Jewish sacred writings.
The content of the Protocols — the call to conspire against the world — is said to be binding for every Jew.
According to Nuwayhid, one of his goals was “the disclosure of the sources of these [the Jewish] drives—the sources to which the Talmud always belonged, like the deeds of Nehemiah, Ezra, Daniel, and Ezekiel during the Babylonian captivity and afterwards.”
Arab scholars are quite familiar with the true history of the fabrication and they usually do not refrain from recounting it. Some retell that history in detail, but still manage to use the Protocols as evidence of a Jewish conspiracy. In the Arabic Wikipedia article on the Protocols, for example, the idea that the booklet is a fabrication is presented as the “opinion of some historians” while others are said to take it seriously.
The writers clearly favor the latter interpretation. The article has been changed often since 2008, but its impact is still the same. Most people are so convinced of the existence of a global Jewish conspiracy that they might see the Protocols as a confirmation of their world view; however, they do not need proof, as al-Aqqad wrote: “It is a fact free of doubt …that the secret government exists with or without these Protocols.”
Later in the same edition at-Tunisi adds: “The forger — assuming that it is a forgery — was undoubtedly an excellent forger, and he was undoubtedly Jewish. For no forger who is not [Jewish] would be able to forge these prophecies.”
At-Tunisi follows a similar kind of logic in many other passages of his introduction. If the person about whom he writes is not undoubtedly Jewish, he or she might be a Jew pretending not to be Jewish, or a non-Jew influenced by “the Jews.” He alleges, for example, that the copies of a 1917 Russian edition of the Protocols were confiscated by the Bolsheviks, who were, either officially or secretly, for the most part Jewish, or at least “henchmen” of the Jews.
He maintains the same view regarding the British parliament,American congressmen, and various UN delegations.
Even today, the Protocols, treated as a factual book, are circulating in the more educated classes in the Arab world. But propaganda and the pervading belief in a Jewish world conspiracy infiltrate all sectors of society.
The production of the Ramadan soap opera ‘Knight without a Horse’ was a high point in the process of 'dumbing-down' the Protocols for the benefit of the often less-educated masses in the Arab world. Over the course of forty-one episodes, this Egyptian soap opera brought the myth into the living rooms of the Arab world in a “prime time” slot after the evening news.
Some argue that this series, which was released in 2002, was already dated. But like the oldest Arabic editions of the Protocols, this drama did not disappear after the first broadcast. It continues to be aired on TV, spreading the messages of the Protocols in probably the most “successful” way.
References to the Protocols can be found in Arab textbooks as well as in academic curricula. Prof. Ahmad Hijazi as-Saqa of the Azhar University in Cairo published two anti-Semitic books on the Protocols in 2003.
Fath Allah of the University of Aleppo wrote the film script of the 2003 Lebanese Ramadan series ‘Diaspora’ which also propagates the notion of a Jewish world conspiracy.
There are thousands of examples that indicate that the belief in a Jewish world conspiracy is a mass phenomenon in the Arab world. The Protocols are only a single example drawn from a vast literature of hate. The study of the popularity of Mein Kampf in the Arab world and widespread Holocaust denial leads to similar findings.
Functions of the Protocols
Conspiracy theories in general fulfill certain functions for societies, individuals, and governments. By creating a world view of black and white, good and evil, in-group and out-group, they have an identity-establishing effect.
This is also the case in the Arab world with the myth of a Jewish world conspiracy. Wars between different Muslim groups or nations, economical backwardness, and even natural disasters are often said to be caused by sinister Jewish forces. For example, it was hard to explain to the Arab world why Fatah and Hamas, two Sunni Muslim Palestinian groups of so-called “freedom fighters,” were not able to form a common government in Gaza after the elections in 2006.
A cartoon in the Qatari newspaper 'al-Watan' from 13 November 2006 portrayed an Orthodox Jew as responsible for the bloodshed between the two. Fatah and Hamas are seen peacefully sitting at the negotiating table, while the Jew secretly places a grenade under it.
In religious contexts, the Jews are often seen as “satanic antagonists” who conveniently serve as an explanation if promised heavenly blessings seem to be denied to Islamic theocracies or groups. In that same context, anti-Semitic out-group discrimination has a strong anti-modern component.
All of these and other “functions” of the Protocols must not be confused with “reasons”. Anti-Semitism is systematically used as an instrument, and Arab- Muslim societies are fertile ground for conspiracy theories. But it must never be accepted as a law of nature that suppression and poverty lead to anti-Semitism.
The very rational, often officially subsidized, use of the Protocols for spreading anti-Jewish propaganda should be seen as the instrumental use of that document.
Disseminating that fabrication does not, however, bring any real relief to the Arab world. On the contrary, it prevents Arabs from looking for solutions to many homemade problems.
Dealing with anti-Semitism among Muslims in Western societies
Anti-Semitic attitudes in Western societies have hardly disappeared; if anything they are on the ascent. However, by only focusing on right-wing extremism we run the risk of ignoring the very real threat of Muslim anti-Semitism.
People in the West have mostly forgotten about the Protocols. Despite their revival in the Arab and Muslim world, they are not garnering much attention.
Yet, as the dangerous lie is still alive and kicking, action must be taken to identify and combat it. A first step of Western governments and societies would be to recognize the facts: This bastion of anti-Semitism in the Arab world is not a collection of exceptions pointed to by those who want to defame Arabs or Muslims, but has become an ideology with deep roots and a strong impact on individuals, societies, and world affairs.

Carmen Matussek is a scholar specializing in Islamic studies in Tübingen, Germany. She is the author of Der Glaube an eine ‘jüdische Weltverschwörung - Die Rezeption der ‘Protokolle der Weisen von Zion’ in der arabischen Welt (2012), a book on how the Protocols of the Elders of Zion are received in the Arab world. Since 2009 she has worked as a freelance journalist and editor, cooperating with the Political Education Authority of the German state of Baden-Württemberg.


Read more...

A Temporary Dwelling: The Journey Toward The Land

Dr. Elana Heideman
The Israel Forever Foundation
There are only 2 mitzvot that we can do with our entire being, both body and soul: The mitzvah of building/dwelling the Sukkah, and the mitzvah of living in the Land of Israel. (Vilna Gaon)
How meaningful it is to appreciate the union of these two mitzvot as Sukkot arrives in Israel.
When the Israelites left Egypt and traveled for forty years to the Land of Israel, they built tents to live in along the way. But in the period surrounding the harvest, temporary huts or booths - Sukkot סוכות - were built with the date and palm branches that signified the completion of the season. The distinction of living space was a reflection of their faith - as a celebration of the life-giving harvest infused with awareness of its Provider, generating true joy and thus making this one of our most festive holidays!
The tradition has been carried on for these thousands of years in keeping with the commandment “You shall dwell in Sukkot for seven days… so that your future generations shall know that I had the children of Israel live in Sukkot when I brought them out of Egypt….” (Leviticus 23:42-43).
The finale of the Chag Season, ending with Simchat Torah in honor of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, the sukkah is in its own way a symbol of peace: it is open to the elements of nature, to the heavens above and to our family and friends...
How wonderful if we can also ensure that this temporary dwelling is an open reflection of our connection to Israel?
Sukkot are built all over the world; But in Israel, it is a truly unique experience. You can enjoy the experience of spending time in your sukkah without the heat of the summer as the nights are cooled by the brisk fall air, as the breeze of this incredible land brushes your skin with such sweetness, such caress, it brings a smile to your face...knowing we are in the land our ancestors journeyed towards, the land in which we were destined to thrive as a people.
Within the modern day mosaic of this incredible country, Sukkot is felt on every corner - yet another part of Jewish life in the Jewish state that unites history, tradition, family and faith in a celebration of our freedom as a people on the ancestral land we have inherited. Here in Israel, there is certainly no need to stay confined to the backyard: nearly every restaurant in the country has a sukkah in which to eat, some even have a lulav and etrog on hand - It’s a beautiful sight to see soldiers, tourists, and locals filled with the joy of this special holiday! The country is (again) on vacation and there are more festivals than one might imagine to fill these days with meaning.
In so many ways, Sukkot offers us the opportunity to connect with the Land in which we were destined to thrive as a people. Every year, we take ourselves out of the comforts of our home to relive an experience that spans the generations and helps us connect with the memory of our ancestors and the journey they traveled to reach the land promised to the Children of Israel. So much meaning has been placed on these temporary dwellings, wherein families gather, guests are welcomed, and delicious dishes concocted to celebrate the abundance of the Land of Israel.
Many people grace the walls of their sukkot with the blessings, images of the species, and sometimes images of the Kotel. As you decorate your Sukkah this year, we invite you to adorn your dwelling with images of the Land that will help remind you of the journey - both ancient and modern - that the Jewish People have traveled to our ancestral homeland, to the place that we can all call home no matter where in the world we might live.
Select a special image that will help you celebrate that connection. Imagine driving the roads of the Judean Hills, or under the canopy of the date trees, wandering the streets of Jerusalem, or standing at the Kotel (The Western Wall) and shaking the Arbaa Minim (The Four Species) with thousands of other Jews...
Indeed, it was once said that "One should concentrate on being part of the entire people of Israel, with intense love and peace, until it may be considered as if all of Israel dwells together in one sukkah." While we may not all be together in the land to fulfill the mitzvah of dwelling in the land, we can unite in our mitzvah of inspiring Israel by combining something temporary with something permanent: our commitment and belonging to Israel.

Please enter your short bio text and copyright clause here (for the "About The Author" box)
There are only 2 mitzvot that we can do with our entire being, both body and soul: The mitzvah of building/dwelling the Sukkah, and the mitzvah of living in the Land of Israel. (Vilna Gaon)
How meaningful it is to appreciate the union of these two mitzvot as Sukkot arrives in Israel.
When the Israelites left Egypt and traveled for forty years to the Land of Israel, they built tents to live in along the way. But in the period surrounding the harvest, temporary huts or booths - Sukkot סוכות - were built with the date and palm branches that signified the completion of the season. The distinction of living space was a reflection of their faith - as a celebration of the life-giving harvest infused with awareness of its Provider, generating true joy and thus making this one of our most festive holidays!
The tradition has been carried on for these thousands of years in keeping with the commandment “You shall dwell in Sukkot for seven days… so that your future generations shall know that I had the children of Israel live in Sukkot when I brought them out of Egypt….” (Leviticus 23:42-43).
The finale of the Chag Season, ending with Simchat Torah in honor of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, the sukkah is in its own way a symbol of peace: it is open to the elements of nature, to the heavens above and to our family and friends...
How wonderful if we can also ensure that this temporary dwelling is an open reflection of our connection to Israel?
Sukkot are built all over the world; But in Israel, it is a truly unique experience. You can enjoy the experience of spending time in your sukkah without the heat of the summer as the nights are cooled by the brisk fall air, as the breeze of this incredible land brushes your skin with such sweetness, such caress, it brings a smile to your face...knowing we are in the land our ancestors journeyed towards, the land in which we were destined to thrive as a people.
Within the modern day mosaic of this incredible country, Sukkot is felt on every corner - yet another part of Jewish life in the Jewish state that unites history, tradition, family and faith in a celebration of our freedom as a people on the ancestral land we have inherited. Here in Israel, there is certainly no need to stay confined to the backyard: nearly every restaurant in the country has a sukkah in which to eat, some even have a lulav and etrog on hand - It’s a beautiful sight to see soldiers, tourists, and locals filled with the joy of this special holiday! The country is (again) on vacation and there are more festivals than one might imagine to fill these days with meaning.
In so many ways, Sukkot offers us the opportunity to connect with the Land in which we were destined to thrive as a people. Every year, we take ourselves out of the comforts of our home to relive an experience that spans the generations and helps us connect with the memory of our ancestors and the journey they traveled to reach the land promised to the Children of Israel. So much meaning has been placed on these temporary dwellings, wherein families gather, guests are welcomed, and delicious dishes concocted to celebrate the abundance of the Land of Israel.
Many people grace the walls of their sukkot with the blessings, images of the species, and sometimes images of the Kotel. As you decorate your Sukkah this year, we invite you to adorn your dwelling with images of the Land that will help remind you of the journey - both ancient and modern - that the Jewish People have traveled to our ancestral homeland, to the place that we can all call home no matter where in the world we might live.
Select a special image that will help you celebrate that connection. Imagine driving the roads of the Judean Hills, or under the canopy of the date trees, wandering the streets of Jerusalem, or standing at the Kotel (The Western Wall) and shaking the Arbaa Minim (The Four Species) with thousands of other Jews...
Indeed, it was once said that "One should concentrate on being part of the entire people of Israel, with intense love and peace, until it may be considered as if all of Israel dwells together in one sukkah." While we may not all be together in the land to fulfill the mitzvah of dwelling in the land, we can unite in our mitzvah of inspiring Israel by combining something temporary with something permanent: our commitment and belonging to Israel.
This year, add some Israel to your Sukkah! Visit us to download your favorite image to hang as a decoration and always be reminded of Israel as we celebrate this special holiday and the journey of ancestors to the land we can all call home.
Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Sections

Jewish Traditions

About Us

Community

Cooperations

Follow Us