Menu
From our family at the " Jewish News Today " to your family Happy Chanukah and best wishes

From our family at the " Jewis…

During Chanukah lets all ...

World Jewish Congress urges UN Security Council to take collective action against Hamas

World Jewish Congress urges UN Secu…

NEW YORK – The World Jewi...

3rd Diplomatic Race to celebrate Israel's special needs community

3rd Diplomatic Race to celebrate Is…

Ahead of International Da...

Deadly Shooting at Pittsburgh Synagogue

Deadly Shooting at Pittsburgh Synag…

According to police and m...

PM Netanyahu's remarks at the start of the weekly cabinet meeting

PM Netanyahu's remarks at the start…

PM Netanyahu: "Israel sta...

11 Dead, 6 Injured in Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

11 Dead, 6 Injured in Pittsburgh Sy…

The gunman who killed 11 ...

World Jewish Congress expresses concern at explosion targeting Jewish community leader in Kazan, Tatarstan

World Jewish Congress expresses con…

NEW YORK - The World Jewi...

PM Netanyahu addresses the Christian Media Summit

PM Netanyahu addresses the Christia…

Iran wants to base itself...

PM Netanyahu visits the Ein Keshatot archaeological site on the Golan Heights

PM Netanyahu visits the Ein Keshato…

We will continue to act w...

PM Netanyahu and Chancellor Merkel hold working meeting

PM Netanyahu and Chancellor Merkel …

​We are seizing the futur...

Prev Next
A+ A A-
Booking.com

Jewish Museums around the Globe

  • Published in Travel
Country

City

Museum

Phone

Argentina

Buenos Aires

Museo Historico Comunal y de la Colonizacion Judia

54.3409.420665

Australia

Darlinghurst

Sydney Jewish Museum

61.2.9360.7999

Australia

Victoria

Jewish Museum of Australia

61.3.9534.0083

Austria

Eisenstadt

Austrian Jewish Museum

43.26.826.5145

Austria

Hohenems

Judisches Museum Hohenems

43.55.767.3989

Austria

Vienna

Jewish Museum Vienna - Judisches Museum der Stadt Wien

43.1.535.0431

Belarus

Vitebsk

Marc Chagall Museum

375.212.372737

Belgium

Brussels

Jewish Museum of Belgium

32.2.512.1963

Canada

New Brunswick

Saint John Jewish Museum

1.506.633.1833

Canada

Toronto

Jewish Canadian Military Museum

1.905.640.0500

Canada

Vancouver, BC

Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia

1.604.257.5199

Canada

Winnipeg

Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada

1.204.477.7460

Czech Rep.

Prague

Jewish Museum in Prague

420.224.819456

Denmark

Copenhagen

Danish Jewish Museum - Dansk Jodisk Museum

45.33112218

France

Bouxwiller

Musee Judeo-Alsacien de Bouxwiller

33.3. 8870.9717

France

Paris

Museum of Jewish Art and History - Musee d'Art et d'Histoire du Judaisme

33.1.5301.8660

Germany

Augsburg

Judisches Kulturmuseum

49.821.513658

Germany

Berlin

Jewish Museum Berlin - Judisches Museum

49.30.878.5681

Germany

Berlin

Neue Synagoge Berlin - Centrum Judaicum

49.30.8802.8451

Germany

Buttenheim

Levi Strauss Museum

49.9545.442602

Germany

Creglingen

Creglingen Jewish Museum

49.79.337010

Germany

Dorsten

Jewish Museum of Westphalia - Judisches Museum Westfalen

49.23.6245279

Germany

Emmendingen

Judisches Museum Emmendingen

49.76.4157.4444

Germany

Frankfurt

Jewish Museum Frankfurt - Judische Museum

49.69.212.35000

Germany

Furth

Jewish Museum of Franconia

49.911.770577

Germany

Goppingen

Jewish Museum in Jebenhausen

 

Germany

Munich

Judisches Museum Munchen

49.89.233.25388

Germany

Munich

Association of European Jewish Museums

 

Germany

Rendsburg

Judische Museum Rendsburg

49.4331.25262

Greece

Athens

Jewish Museum of Greece

30.10.322.5582

Greece

Crete

Etz Hayyim Synagogue, Hania

30.282.108.6286

Greece

Thessaloniki

Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

30.2310.250406

Hungary

Budapest

Hungarian Jewish Museum and Archives

36.1.343.6756

Ireland

Dublin

Irish-Jewish Museum

353.1.490.1857

Israel

 

Directory of Museums in Israel

 

Italy

Bologna

Jewish Museum of Bologna - Museo Ebraica di Bologna

39.051.291.1280

Italy

Ferrara

Museo Ebraico di Ferrara

39.532.210228

Italy

Florence

Jewish Museum of Florence - Museo Ebraico di Firenze

39.055.234.6654

Italy

Livorno

Jewish Museum of Leghorn

39.058.683.9772

Italy

Rome

Jewish Museum of Rome - Museo Ebraico di Roma

39.066.840.0662

Italy

Soragna

Jewish Museum of Soragna - Museo Ebraico di Soragna

39.0524.599399

Italy

Venice

Jewish Museum of Venice - Museo Ebraico di Venezia

39.041.715359

Latvia

Riga

"Jews in Latvia" Museum

371.6728.3484

Lithuania

Vilnius

Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum

370.5.212.7912

Mexico

 

Museo Historico Judio Y del Holocausto

5211.6908

Netherlands

Amsterdam

Jewish Historical Museum - Joods Historisch Museum

31.20.626.9945

Norway

Oslo

Oslo Jewish Museum - Jodisk Museum

47.2220.8400

Poland

Krakow

Galicia Jewish Museum

48.12.4216842

Poland

Krakow

Old Synagogue - Stara Synagoga

48.12.6192300

Poland

Warszawa

Jewish Historical Institute

48.22.8279221

Poland

Warszawa

Museum of the History of Polish Jews

48.22.833.0021

Russia

Moscow

Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center

7.495.645.0550

Slovakia

Bratislava

Museum of Jewish Culture, Slovak Jewish Heritage

421.2.5934.9142

South Africa

Cape Town

South African Jewish Museum

27.21.465.1546

Spain

 

Red de Judeira - Network of Spanish Jewish Quarters

34.972.414146

Spain

Cordoba

House of Sepharad - Casa de Sefarad

34.957.421404

Spain

Toledo

Museo Sefardi

34.92522.3665

Sweden

Stockholm

Jewish Museum in Stockholm

46.8.310143

Turkey

Istanbul

Jewish Museum of Turkey

90.212.292.6333

U.K.

Glasgow

Scottish Jewish Archives Centre

44.141.332.4911

U.K.

London

Ben Uri Gallery, Jewish Museum of Art

44.20.7604.3991

U.K.

London

Jewish Museum

44.20.8349.1143

U.K.

Manchester

Manchester Jewish Museum

44.161.834.9879

Ukraine

Odessa

Jewish Museum of Odessa

38.048.728.9743

USA

 

Jewish-American Hall of Fame

1.818.225.1348

USA

Anchorage, AK

Alaska Jewish Historical Museum

1.907.770.7021

USA

Atlanta, GA

Jewish Heritage Museum

1.404.870.7684

USA

Baltimore, MD

Jewish Museum of Maryland

1.410.732.6400

USA

Beachwood, OH

Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage

1.216.593.0575

USA

Berkeley, CA

Magnes Museum

1.510.549.6950

USA

Beverly Hills, CA

Center for Iranian Jewish Oral History

1.310.472.3012

USA

Boca Raton, FL

Builders of America - The Jewish Heritage - A traveling exhibit

 

USA

Denver, CO

Council of American Jewish Museums

303.871.3015

USA

Denver, CO

Mizel Museum of Judaica

1.303.394.9993

USA

Jackson, MS

Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience

1.601.362.6357

USA

Los Angeles

Rhodes Jewish Museum

1.310.475.4779

USA

Los Angeles

Skirball Cultural Center

1.310.440.4500

USA

Miami Beach

Jewish Museum of Florida

1.305.672.5044

USA

New York

Yeshiva University Museum

1.212.294.8330

USA

New York

Jewish Museum

1.212.423.3200

USA

New York

Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue and Museum

1.516.221.2712

USA

New York, NY

Jewish Children's Museum

1.718.467.0600

USA

New York, NY

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

1.212.246.6080

USA

Newark, NJ

Jewish Museum of New Jersey

1.973.227.8854

USA

Philadelphia

National Museum of American Jewish History

1.215.923.3811

USA

Portland, OR

Oregon Jewish Museum

1.503.226.3600

USA

San Francisco

Contemporary Jewish Museum

1.415.655.7800

USA

Tulsa, OK

Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art

1.918.492.1818

USA

Washington, DC

National Museum of American Jewish Military History

1.202.265.6280

USA

Washington, DC

B'nai B'rith National Jewish Museum

1.202.857.6647

USA

Woodbine, NJ

Sam Azeez Museum of Woodbine Heritage

1.609.861.5355

Venezuela

Caracas

Museo Sefaradi de Caracas

58.212.578.1489

Read more...

Have backpack, will travel

  • Published in Travel

Looking for an independent adventure where you can connect with local people and culture? Israel is ideal for the backpack traveler

By Avigayil Kadesh
It’s been almost a year since Lee Balot, 31, opened The Green Backpackers - a hiker-friendly, eco-friendly hostel-like lodge at the edge of the Mitzpeh Ramon natural crater in southern Israel.
“I was a tour guide and I worked in the hospitality industry, but the stuff I really like doing is talking to guests and explaining hikes and trails, which I didn’t have time to do in the hotels,” Balot says. “I also saw that backpackers did not have a real answer for their needs in Mitzpeh Ramon. The only cheap places to sleep here are tents outdoors, and it gets very cold in the winter.”
Balot is on the cutting edge of a new niche in Israeli tourism focused specifically on backpackers - and on “flashpackers,” as Gal Mor, co-owner of Jerusalem’s new Abraham Hostel, calls spontaneous travelers who book a flight and their first night’s accommodation, hoping to make personal connections to plan out the rest of the journey.
Backpack tourists might not even have an actual backpack. They are distinguished not by their choice of luggage but by their desire for interaction with other travelers and natives, independent travel and exploring new destinations. Many will come back and tour Israel in a more traditional way when they are older and economically well-off.
“Our core guests are backpackers mostly from Europe, the US and Australia, ages 25-35, and we enable them to meet and share information with the other guests in the common areas we provide,” says Mor, who has backpacked around Europe and Israel.
Mor’s business partner Maoz Inon says Israel offers backpackers many historic sites and beautiful landscapes within a relatively short distance from each other, making it a lot easier to navigate than in places like expansive South America, New Zealand or Australia. It also helps that Israel’s weather is predictable. Even in the rainy season, he says, backpacking in Israel is manageable.
“Israel is just a short flight from Western Europe, where most backpackers are coming from,” Maoz points out.
Interacting with the locals
According to Mor, the main appeal of backpacking is the ability to interact with local people and local culture. “You are not on a bus with a homogenous group and a guide. You’re on your own. One of Israel’s most unique aspects is the different diverse cultures of Jews and Muslims, and as a backpacker you can choose to experience that alone or with an organized group.”
A website called Backpacking Israel lists hundreds of trekking and hiking routes - including the famous Israel Trail - for backpackers, cyclists, adventurers and extreme-sports lovers.
Blogging backpacker Miriam Berger of Travelling Starfish advises: “If you are looking for an inexpensive but satisfying backpacking adventure, you should look no further than the land of milk and honey. Israel is a backpackers’ dream. Not only is there so much to see without having to travel a far distance, you can do it quite cheaply in ways unique to this glorious country.”
To help their customers figure out what to see and how to get around, the Abraham Hostel - named for the biblical forefather, “the first backpacker in the Middle East” - has an information desk staffed seven days a week with expert backpackers.
“If you like archeology and hiking, for example, we can put together an itinerary for you,” says Mor. “And we offer daily free ‘Introduction to Travel in Israel’ lectures giving useful tools for somebody who’s just arrived.”
He says the iconic areas not to be missed include the Old City and Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem; the Dead Sea/Masada/Ein Gedi; Bethlehem; Tel Aviv-Jaffa; Haifa; and Eilat.
“More off the beaten track there’s Nazareth, which is fascinating in religious and historic history - a mixed city that enjoys a pleasant status quo, a vibrant market and a good central location for day trips to other parts of the Galilee. And there’s Acre [Acco], with its old port and market; the archeological park at Beit She’an; and the Golan Heights or Judean or Negev deserts, including Mitzpeh Ramon,” he suggests. Guests interested in culture and nightlife get recommendations for theater and walking tours.
“If our backpackers are into wildlife, we recommend visiting Hai-Bar Yotvata Nature Reserve to see a good representation of the wildlife of Israel, or the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo, especially if they have kids. For bird-watchers, there’s the Hula Valley, depending on the season, and the Jerusalem Bird Observatory.”
Guest houses bridge backpackers and locals
Balot runs Green Backpackers in partnership with another experienced guide. They offer sunset tours of the crater, telescope tours of the night sky and arrangements for Bedouin hospitality.
“If they want hiking, we go inside the crater or in the area around it, or even in Sde Boker, 20 minutes away by bus, so we cover a pretty large area. Sometimes people go into the crater and camp out in it for a few days, so we lend them equipment. They can also go horseback riding, do ecological workshops or -- if they have a car -- visit the farms in the area and get tastes of homemade cheeses and wines.”
Their “base camp” features bunk accommodations, Wi-Fi, cooking facilities, gear rental and other services. And it’s environmentally friendly, as its name suggests.
“We thought about finding a large area and building with mud, but people told me the best ecological idea was to reuse an existing place. Eventually I saw a house that was right near my apartment, with a small elevator, and I knew it was meant to be.”
Even before its official opening, Green Backpackers had guests “sleeping on mattresses on the floor while we were painting the walls,” says Balot.
“We posted on hostel [Internet] sites and from the beginning we had people -- Germans, Canadians, Dutch, French, Japanese, Russians, Chinese and a few Israelis. Israelis have other places to sleep here and we try to give priority to backpackers from abroad.”
Balot just expanded to another apartment, adding three more rooms. “There are so many more backpackers now that we’ve had to send them to other hostels in Mitzpeh Ramon, and it’s gratifying to know we contributed to that,” she says.
She is working with the Ramat Negev Regional Council on a new map of the whole area, showing tourist attractions such as David Ben-Gurion’s grave in Sde Boker; the Avdat National Park; bus routes and bicycle trails.
“People could stay here much longer if they have stuff to do,” says Balot, who hails from the Tel Aviv area but fell in love with Mitzpeh Ramon as a teenager.
Inon, who is also the entrepreneur behind the Fauzi Azar Inn in the Old City of Nazareth and the nearby Jesus Trail popular with Christian tourists, has backpacked around the world twice.
“I have traveled to some of the most beautiful places in the world, and I realized there is no match for the biblical lands in terms of the history and culture,” he says. “I saw a real potential for backpack tourism in Israel. It was completely undeveloped when I started in 2005.”
Inon got the notion for Fauzi Azar while in South America with his wife. “We learned that guesthouses can often bridge between backpackers and local communities by creating a venue for interaction,” he says. “We’re in the Old City, so our guests have the chance to interact daily with merchants and neighbors and local staff to get a better understanding of this old Arab city.”
Guests may help out at the reception desk, where they meet people from all over the world. They can participate in community projects such as cleaning the Jesus Trail, teaching English lessons and organizing special events such as the Flavor of Nazareth, where local restaurants contribute food for a tasting festival.
Independent-minded
Israel’s network of youth hostels and kibbutz guest houses have always been appealing to backpackers. “For the backpacker, you are spoiled for choice when it comes to hostels in this country and all are safe and you’re welcomed with great hospitality,” writes Berger.
“There are so many unique opportunities in Israel to donate your time in exchange for accommodation and/or food. I’ve heard stories of many of my fellow travelers finding opportunities to help out on farms, homes and even wineries. The best part of this is that you don’t just get a place to lay your head; you also get to meet some new people who can tell you what living in Israel is all about.”
A new awareness of backpackers’ needs has led to even more. “When we started with Fauzi Azar in 2005, there was no infrastructure or facilities for backpackers,” says Inon. The inn has grown from three to 14 rooms.
“With a few others, we created that by encouraging more and more guest houses and hostels to open dormitory facilities and give out printed maps and other information for independent travelers.”
This benefits not only the visitors but also the locals. “Tourism is about economic development, and staying in small kibbutzim, villages and towns is a great way to support and bring economic prosperity to the periphery,” says Inon. “Unlike mass tourism, here we really get a chance to support small business and local communities. We believe in it as a philosophy.”
This philosophy is paramount, he adds.
“Backpackers have changed over time,” Inon observes. “Now many of them are in a rented car and don’t have a backpack, but they’re still looking for interaction with other travelers and natives. They’re still traveling independently, not in a group and not like traditional tourists. They want to explore new destinations, and we believe that Israel has huge potential for them as a new destination.”

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Sections

Jewish Traditions

About Us

Community

Cooperations

Follow Us