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Sixty Minute Seder - YOU NO LONGER NEED TO PASS OVER PASSOVER

Many of our readers are already considering whether to keep the same old Haggadah for next Passover or try something new. Well we have something for you to consider, something that surprisingly proves it’s possible for a Reform, Progressive, Liberal, Reconstructionist, Conservative and Orthodox Rabbi to agree on something: The soon-to-be released Sixty-Minute Seder: Preserving the Essence of the Passover Haggadah by the husband and wife team, Cass and Nellie Foster, of Kauai.

Not only are Rabbis from every denomination turning in favorable reviews, they’re coming from all over the world. So what is it they’re praising? We’ll let them speak for themselves as we start with a Conservative Rabbi in the U.S. and a Reform Rabbi in Spain: Rabbi Jerome Epstein, the Chief Israel Affairs Officer of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism says: “For those who seek a modified Seder that will stimulate discussion, inspire interest and educate Jews with a range of backgrounds will find the Sixty-Minute Seder a perfect script for the Pesach drama.” And then Rabbi Bonnie Cohen in Spain says: “(This) is a wonderful resource that will enable people to create their own Passover Seder in a personal and meaningful way…I highly recommend it.”

A Reform Rabbi in Israel, Rabbi Michael Boyden tells us: “Creating such a Haggadah is no simple undertaking and you are to be congratulated for making the traditional Haggadah more accessible.” And a similar review from the U.K., Rabbi Dr. Andrew Goldstein, President, Liberal Judaism: "You have done a great job in highlighting the main points of the Haggadah and arranging them in an order that allows the Seder to flow and the story it tells to be easily absorbed...I hope the book is a success and helps many to have a meaningful Seder."

Rabbi Judith HaLevy, a Reconstructionist Rabbi at the Malibu Jewish Center and Synagogue in the U.S. gives us a good sense of the contents: “Cass and Nellie Foster have done an amazing job of sifting the essence of the Passover ritual from the embellishments of time. Each section is explained clearly, with the appropriate blessings in Hebrew and transliteration. The outstanding glossary of terms make it possible for a newcomer to understand the background of the symbols and rituals without adding long readings to the text.”

While Rabbi David Stern, a Conservative Rabbi in Victoria, Australia adds, “Sure to inspire and aid in Seders for years to come!" And an Orthodox Rabbi, Rabbi Leo Fettman, co-author of SHOAH: Journey from the Ashes, gives us a unique perspective with "You have created a Sixty-Minute Seder for seniors! We love your book. It is great and written so warmly and clearly, it’s perfect for our seniors here at the care facility.”

And then we hear from the Liberal Rabbi Dr. Walter Rothschild of Vienna, Austria who is also the State Rabbi of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany with: " 'Dayenu' - yes, one CAN have enough, one can have much more than enough, and it is important to concentrate on the basics so that all present can experience, learn and enjoy the Seder. This is what the Sixty-Minute Haggadah sets out to do and it succeeds!"

And we conclude our worldwide praise by returning to the U.S. with Conservative Rabbi Jack Moline of Agudas Achim Congregation in Alexandria, Virginia: “…you now hold an opportunity to discover a truth about this long-standing ritual that is often obscured by the focus on form over substance. The order of the Seder is a framework for building your own story of liberation. Cass and Nellie Foster have distilled it to its essence.”

When we asked the Fosters how they went about reducing a typically two-to-five hour long Seder to sixty minutes Cass tells us he did do some reduction with a few of the
steps but “Primarily eliminated commentary. We’re hoping our readers will be satisfied with going through the steps in the proper order as we provide an opportunity to explore their own point of view.” And Nellie adds, “We spend a fair amount of time explaining how to prepare the home and conduct the Seder and I provide plenty of meal suggestions but the bottom line is our readers will be able to host a Seder regardless of how familiar they are with Passover or Judaism in general. We kept the unaffiliated and Interfaith families very much in mind when we put this together.”

According to Linda F. Radke, the president of Five Star Publications, Inc., the publisher of the Sixty-Minute Seder: Preserving the Essence of the Passover Haggadah, “With more than 3,500 Haggadahs in print and no two having the same content, revisiting the Haggadah is not unheard of. Though pared down to only sixty minutes, this Haggadah still has it all, from planning to preparation to the actual presentation of the Seder.”

And what makes their Haggadah even more different is the opportunity for readers to provide input on their experience with the Haggadah. Cass and Nellie have already implemented improvements for their next edition thanks to reader feedback.

For information about ordering please contact Five Star Publications, Inc. by
phoning (480) 940-8182, emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by visiting their website at www.SixtyMinuteSeder.com - where you can also learn more about the Rabbis mentioned in this article in their REVIEW section. Just tell them you learned about them from the New York Jewish Guide.
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Magical Songs

Written by Revital Belz, a member of ajudaica, When I was in labor with my son I was a nervous wreck! My husband, who is generally very calm, was doing his best to keep me relaxed. Finally – and to my surprise – he found a trick. He started singing the song that was played at our wedding. Music really does have a magical effect!
Perek Shirah: When I was in tenth grade two of my friend’s and I decided to go to Florida on winter vacation. We were a group of three Orthodox-Jewish girls. On the plane on the way back there were two religious women sitting in front of us. I noticed that they were both learning something the entire ride. The book they were reading from was beautifully decorated with pictures of animals and nature. The women were also clearly quite emotional while they were reading. Finally towards the end of the flight I gained the courage to ask them what they were reading. The women were more than happy to talk. They explained that they were reading Perek Shirah “Chapter of Songs” a compilation of biblical and rabbinic verses in order to sing G-d’s praise. The book is organized into chapters based on who is singing the praises – sometimes animals, heavens or man. That explained all the beautiful pictures. The women also explained that many people recite Perek Shirah (the entire book!) for forty consecutive days in order to merit various things such as a spouse, children, or health. The woman on the plane opened up to me and said that they were actually both in their late thirties and single. They had been dating for years and started saying Perek Shirah 35 days ago in the hopes that they might finally merit to meet someone. I never expected the flight home from Florida to be so emotional, but that story will probably stick with me forever.

Psalms: One of the most well memorized books is the Book of Psalms. The most common opinion is that they were written by King David when he was running away from Saul. The fact that they were written by a man during a perilous period is quite apparent from the text. People of many religious recite psalms in times of need, and it is not uncommon for people of faith to memorize countless verses. When I was in University I had two Christian friends – Caleb and Marissa – they got together every Sunday evening to sit and recite Psalms together. On one occasion I walked by Marissa’s room. From the rhythm it was clear that they had memorized much of what they were reciting. Caleb, who came from a very religious family, told me that he actually knew the entire book by heart!
I have lived in Israel for the past four years. I frequently travel by bus early in the morning, and I am always amazed by what I see. On almost every bus route that I have been on between the hours of six and nine in the morning I tend to see most people doing one of two things. As would be expected anywhere, I see many people who are dozing off, trying to catch a little extra sleep before getting to work. However, what I find amazing is the number of people I see with an open book of psalms in hand reading the words intently. What is even more impressive is the diversity of the people who chose to spend their morning bus ride reciting psalms. Though I probably shouldn’t have interrupted, my curiosity took over as I approached one woman just last week. She was a pale blonde older woman wearing a mini skirt and a tank top. I watched this woman as she recited psalm after psalm after psalm. There was something about the way that she was focused that told me that she had a story. I watched her for about twenty minutes hoping she would take a break at some point so I could talk to her, but alas, she showed no sign of ending her prayers any time soon. Finally, I got up and approached her, tapping on her shoulder and noting exactly what I observed. I asked her if there was anything in particular that she was thinking of and told her that I would be happy add my own prayers as well. I will admit that the woman looked a bit startled by my imposing but then she did open up. The lady explained that she was praying for her daughter, who had been trying to conceive for twelve years unsuccessfully. The woman explained that saying the psalms was the only thing that gave her comfort – as she felt it was the only thing she could really do. Through tears the woman said “Psalms are magical, my mother prayed that she would be pregnant with me.”


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Jewish Museums around the Globe

  • Published in Travel
Country

City

Museum

Phone

Argentina

Buenos Aires

Museo Historico Comunal y de la Colonizacion Judia

54.3409.420665

Australia

Darlinghurst

Sydney Jewish Museum

61.2.9360.7999

Australia

Victoria

Jewish Museum of Australia

61.3.9534.0083

Austria

Eisenstadt

Austrian Jewish Museum

43.26.826.5145

Austria

Hohenems

Judisches Museum Hohenems

43.55.767.3989

Austria

Vienna

Jewish Museum Vienna - Judisches Museum der Stadt Wien

43.1.535.0431

Belarus

Vitebsk

Marc Chagall Museum

375.212.372737

Belgium

Brussels

Jewish Museum of Belgium

32.2.512.1963

Canada

New Brunswick

Saint John Jewish Museum

1.506.633.1833

Canada

Toronto

Jewish Canadian Military Museum

1.905.640.0500

Canada

Vancouver, BC

Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia

1.604.257.5199

Canada

Winnipeg

Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada

1.204.477.7460

Czech Rep.

Prague

Jewish Museum in Prague

420.224.819456

Denmark

Copenhagen

Danish Jewish Museum - Dansk Jodisk Museum

45.33112218

France

Bouxwiller

Musee Judeo-Alsacien de Bouxwiller

33.3. 8870.9717

France

Paris

Museum of Jewish Art and History - Musee d'Art et d'Histoire du Judaisme

33.1.5301.8660

Germany

Augsburg

Judisches Kulturmuseum

49.821.513658

Germany

Berlin

Jewish Museum Berlin - Judisches Museum

49.30.878.5681

Germany

Berlin

Neue Synagoge Berlin - Centrum Judaicum

49.30.8802.8451

Germany

Buttenheim

Levi Strauss Museum

49.9545.442602

Germany

Creglingen

Creglingen Jewish Museum

49.79.337010

Germany

Dorsten

Jewish Museum of Westphalia - Judisches Museum Westfalen

49.23.6245279

Germany

Emmendingen

Judisches Museum Emmendingen

49.76.4157.4444

Germany

Frankfurt

Jewish Museum Frankfurt - Judische Museum

49.69.212.35000

Germany

Furth

Jewish Museum of Franconia

49.911.770577

Germany

Goppingen

Jewish Museum in Jebenhausen

 

Germany

Munich

Judisches Museum Munchen

49.89.233.25388

Germany

Munich

Association of European Jewish Museums

 

Germany

Rendsburg

Judische Museum Rendsburg

49.4331.25262

Greece

Athens

Jewish Museum of Greece

30.10.322.5582

Greece

Crete

Etz Hayyim Synagogue, Hania

30.282.108.6286

Greece

Thessaloniki

Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

30.2310.250406

Hungary

Budapest

Hungarian Jewish Museum and Archives

36.1.343.6756

Ireland

Dublin

Irish-Jewish Museum

353.1.490.1857

Israel

 

Directory of Museums in Israel

 

Italy

Bologna

Jewish Museum of Bologna - Museo Ebraica di Bologna

39.051.291.1280

Italy

Ferrara

Museo Ebraico di Ferrara

39.532.210228

Italy

Florence

Jewish Museum of Florence - Museo Ebraico di Firenze

39.055.234.6654

Italy

Livorno

Jewish Museum of Leghorn

39.058.683.9772

Italy

Rome

Jewish Museum of Rome - Museo Ebraico di Roma

39.066.840.0662

Italy

Soragna

Jewish Museum of Soragna - Museo Ebraico di Soragna

39.0524.599399

Italy

Venice

Jewish Museum of Venice - Museo Ebraico di Venezia

39.041.715359

Latvia

Riga

"Jews in Latvia" Museum

371.6728.3484

Lithuania

Vilnius

Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum

370.5.212.7912

Mexico

 

Museo Historico Judio Y del Holocausto

5211.6908

Netherlands

Amsterdam

Jewish Historical Museum - Joods Historisch Museum

31.20.626.9945

Norway

Oslo

Oslo Jewish Museum - Jodisk Museum

47.2220.8400

Poland

Krakow

Galicia Jewish Museum

48.12.4216842

Poland

Krakow

Old Synagogue - Stara Synagoga

48.12.6192300

Poland

Warszawa

Jewish Historical Institute

48.22.8279221

Poland

Warszawa

Museum of the History of Polish Jews

48.22.833.0021

Russia

Moscow

Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center

7.495.645.0550

Slovakia

Bratislava

Museum of Jewish Culture, Slovak Jewish Heritage

421.2.5934.9142

South Africa

Cape Town

South African Jewish Museum

27.21.465.1546

Spain

 

Red de Judeira - Network of Spanish Jewish Quarters

34.972.414146

Spain

Cordoba

House of Sepharad - Casa de Sefarad

34.957.421404

Spain

Toledo

Museo Sefardi

34.92522.3665

Sweden

Stockholm

Jewish Museum in Stockholm

46.8.310143

Turkey

Istanbul

Jewish Museum of Turkey

90.212.292.6333

U.K.

Glasgow

Scottish Jewish Archives Centre

44.141.332.4911

U.K.

London

Ben Uri Gallery, Jewish Museum of Art

44.20.7604.3991

U.K.

London

Jewish Museum

44.20.8349.1143

U.K.

Manchester

Manchester Jewish Museum

44.161.834.9879

Ukraine

Odessa

Jewish Museum of Odessa

38.048.728.9743

USA

 

Jewish-American Hall of Fame

1.818.225.1348

USA

Anchorage, AK

Alaska Jewish Historical Museum

1.907.770.7021

USA

Atlanta, GA

Jewish Heritage Museum

1.404.870.7684

USA

Baltimore, MD

Jewish Museum of Maryland

1.410.732.6400

USA

Beachwood, OH

Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage

1.216.593.0575

USA

Berkeley, CA

Magnes Museum

1.510.549.6950

USA

Beverly Hills, CA

Center for Iranian Jewish Oral History

1.310.472.3012

USA

Boca Raton, FL

Builders of America - The Jewish Heritage - A traveling exhibit

 

USA

Denver, CO

Council of American Jewish Museums

303.871.3015

USA

Denver, CO

Mizel Museum of Judaica

1.303.394.9993

USA

Jackson, MS

Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience

1.601.362.6357

USA

Los Angeles

Rhodes Jewish Museum

1.310.475.4779

USA

Los Angeles

Skirball Cultural Center

1.310.440.4500

USA

Miami Beach

Jewish Museum of Florida

1.305.672.5044

USA

New York

Yeshiva University Museum

1.212.294.8330

USA

New York

Jewish Museum

1.212.423.3200

USA

New York

Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue and Museum

1.516.221.2712

USA

New York, NY

Jewish Children's Museum

1.718.467.0600

USA

New York, NY

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

1.212.246.6080

USA

Newark, NJ

Jewish Museum of New Jersey

1.973.227.8854

USA

Philadelphia

National Museum of American Jewish History

1.215.923.3811

USA

Portland, OR

Oregon Jewish Museum

1.503.226.3600

USA

San Francisco

Contemporary Jewish Museum

1.415.655.7800

USA

Tulsa, OK

Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art

1.918.492.1818

USA

Washington, DC

National Museum of American Jewish Military History

1.202.265.6280

USA

Washington, DC

B'nai B'rith National Jewish Museum

1.202.857.6647

USA

Woodbine, NJ

Sam Azeez Museum of Woodbine Heritage

1.609.861.5355

Venezuela

Caracas

Museo Sefaradi de Caracas

58.212.578.1489

Read more...

The North African Jewish heritage

The Worldwide North Africa Jewish Heritage Center in Jerusalem exhibits the culture that is common to the Muslims and to the Jews of North Africa, while the Israeli Andalusian Orchestra Ashdod creates a connecting link between Jews and Arabs. 

Jerusalem, The Worldwide North Africa Jewish Heritage Center, established in 1854 by Rabbi David Ben Shimon, is located in the Mughrabi neighborhood of Jerusalem, known also as Mamilla, in the center of a stunning garden with authentic Moroccan design.

The Center offers exhibitions showing the extraordinary history and heritage of the Jews communities of North Africa. The crown of the center is an audio-visual presentation, that include documents, movies, music, bibliography, and pictures telling the thrilling narrative of the Jewish communities in Morocco, Algeria and Tunis.

Andalusian music arrived in Israel with the immigrants from North Africa in the late 1950s and early 60s. The Israel Andalusian Orchestra founded in Ashdod includes both musicians trained in Western classical music and musicians playing traditional instruments, including the oud, the mandolin and the darbuka.

The Israeli Andalusian Orchestra was the first in the world to apply Western musical notation to ancient Andalusian music, to document and record this centuries-old music in new orchestral arrangements. In 2006, the orchestra was awarded the Israel Prize, for its lifetime achievement and special contribution to Israeli society.

Read more...

A Temporary Dwelling: The Journey Toward The Land

Dr. Elana Heideman
The Israel Forever Foundation
There are only 2 mitzvot that we can do with our entire being, both body and soul: The mitzvah of building/dwelling the Sukkah, and the mitzvah of living in the Land of Israel. (Vilna Gaon)
How meaningful it is to appreciate the union of these two mitzvot as Sukkot arrives in Israel.
When the Israelites left Egypt and traveled for forty years to the Land of Israel, they built tents to live in along the way. But in the period surrounding the harvest, temporary huts or booths - Sukkot סוכות - were built with the date and palm branches that signified the completion of the season. The distinction of living space was a reflection of their faith - as a celebration of the life-giving harvest infused with awareness of its Provider, generating true joy and thus making this one of our most festive holidays!
The tradition has been carried on for these thousands of years in keeping with the commandment “You shall dwell in Sukkot for seven days… so that your future generations shall know that I had the children of Israel live in Sukkot when I brought them out of Egypt….” (Leviticus 23:42-43).
The finale of the Chag Season, ending with Simchat Torah in honor of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, the sukkah is in its own way a symbol of peace: it is open to the elements of nature, to the heavens above and to our family and friends...
How wonderful if we can also ensure that this temporary dwelling is an open reflection of our connection to Israel?
Sukkot are built all over the world; But in Israel, it is a truly unique experience. You can enjoy the experience of spending time in your sukkah without the heat of the summer as the nights are cooled by the brisk fall air, as the breeze of this incredible land brushes your skin with such sweetness, such caress, it brings a smile to your face...knowing we are in the land our ancestors journeyed towards, the land in which we were destined to thrive as a people.
Within the modern day mosaic of this incredible country, Sukkot is felt on every corner - yet another part of Jewish life in the Jewish state that unites history, tradition, family and faith in a celebration of our freedom as a people on the ancestral land we have inherited. Here in Israel, there is certainly no need to stay confined to the backyard: nearly every restaurant in the country has a sukkah in which to eat, some even have a lulav and etrog on hand - It’s a beautiful sight to see soldiers, tourists, and locals filled with the joy of this special holiday! The country is (again) on vacation and there are more festivals than one might imagine to fill these days with meaning.
In so many ways, Sukkot offers us the opportunity to connect with the Land in which we were destined to thrive as a people. Every year, we take ourselves out of the comforts of our home to relive an experience that spans the generations and helps us connect with the memory of our ancestors and the journey they traveled to reach the land promised to the Children of Israel. So much meaning has been placed on these temporary dwellings, wherein families gather, guests are welcomed, and delicious dishes concocted to celebrate the abundance of the Land of Israel.
Many people grace the walls of their sukkot with the blessings, images of the species, and sometimes images of the Kotel. As you decorate your Sukkah this year, we invite you to adorn your dwelling with images of the Land that will help remind you of the journey - both ancient and modern - that the Jewish People have traveled to our ancestral homeland, to the place that we can all call home no matter where in the world we might live.
Select a special image that will help you celebrate that connection. Imagine driving the roads of the Judean Hills, or under the canopy of the date trees, wandering the streets of Jerusalem, or standing at the Kotel (The Western Wall) and shaking the Arbaa Minim (The Four Species) with thousands of other Jews...
Indeed, it was once said that "One should concentrate on being part of the entire people of Israel, with intense love and peace, until it may be considered as if all of Israel dwells together in one sukkah." While we may not all be together in the land to fulfill the mitzvah of dwelling in the land, we can unite in our mitzvah of inspiring Israel by combining something temporary with something permanent: our commitment and belonging to Israel.

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There are only 2 mitzvot that we can do with our entire being, both body and soul: The mitzvah of building/dwelling the Sukkah, and the mitzvah of living in the Land of Israel. (Vilna Gaon)
How meaningful it is to appreciate the union of these two mitzvot as Sukkot arrives in Israel.
When the Israelites left Egypt and traveled for forty years to the Land of Israel, they built tents to live in along the way. But in the period surrounding the harvest, temporary huts or booths - Sukkot סוכות - were built with the date and palm branches that signified the completion of the season. The distinction of living space was a reflection of their faith - as a celebration of the life-giving harvest infused with awareness of its Provider, generating true joy and thus making this one of our most festive holidays!
The tradition has been carried on for these thousands of years in keeping with the commandment “You shall dwell in Sukkot for seven days… so that your future generations shall know that I had the children of Israel live in Sukkot when I brought them out of Egypt….” (Leviticus 23:42-43).
The finale of the Chag Season, ending with Simchat Torah in honor of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, the sukkah is in its own way a symbol of peace: it is open to the elements of nature, to the heavens above and to our family and friends...
How wonderful if we can also ensure that this temporary dwelling is an open reflection of our connection to Israel?
Sukkot are built all over the world; But in Israel, it is a truly unique experience. You can enjoy the experience of spending time in your sukkah without the heat of the summer as the nights are cooled by the brisk fall air, as the breeze of this incredible land brushes your skin with such sweetness, such caress, it brings a smile to your face...knowing we are in the land our ancestors journeyed towards, the land in which we were destined to thrive as a people.
Within the modern day mosaic of this incredible country, Sukkot is felt on every corner - yet another part of Jewish life in the Jewish state that unites history, tradition, family and faith in a celebration of our freedom as a people on the ancestral land we have inherited. Here in Israel, there is certainly no need to stay confined to the backyard: nearly every restaurant in the country has a sukkah in which to eat, some even have a lulav and etrog on hand - It’s a beautiful sight to see soldiers, tourists, and locals filled with the joy of this special holiday! The country is (again) on vacation and there are more festivals than one might imagine to fill these days with meaning.
In so many ways, Sukkot offers us the opportunity to connect with the Land in which we were destined to thrive as a people. Every year, we take ourselves out of the comforts of our home to relive an experience that spans the generations and helps us connect with the memory of our ancestors and the journey they traveled to reach the land promised to the Children of Israel. So much meaning has been placed on these temporary dwellings, wherein families gather, guests are welcomed, and delicious dishes concocted to celebrate the abundance of the Land of Israel.
Many people grace the walls of their sukkot with the blessings, images of the species, and sometimes images of the Kotel. As you decorate your Sukkah this year, we invite you to adorn your dwelling with images of the Land that will help remind you of the journey - both ancient and modern - that the Jewish People have traveled to our ancestral homeland, to the place that we can all call home no matter where in the world we might live.
Select a special image that will help you celebrate that connection. Imagine driving the roads of the Judean Hills, or under the canopy of the date trees, wandering the streets of Jerusalem, or standing at the Kotel (The Western Wall) and shaking the Arbaa Minim (The Four Species) with thousands of other Jews...
Indeed, it was once said that "One should concentrate on being part of the entire people of Israel, with intense love and peace, until it may be considered as if all of Israel dwells together in one sukkah." While we may not all be together in the land to fulfill the mitzvah of dwelling in the land, we can unite in our mitzvah of inspiring Israel by combining something temporary with something permanent: our commitment and belonging to Israel.
This year, add some Israel to your Sukkah! Visit us to download your favorite image to hang as a decoration and always be reminded of Israel as we celebrate this special holiday and the journey of ancestors to the land we can all call home.
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Apple Cake

 Cake:

3 eggs

3/4 cup sugar

1/3 cup oil

3/4 cup cake meal

5 apples, peeled & sliced (Granny Smiths are best)

Topping:

1/3 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup sugar

2 tsp. cinnamon

In a medium sized mixing bowl, beat the eggs with the sugar and oil until the mixture is light. Add the cake meal and mix well. Pour half of the mixture into a lightly greased 8 or 9 inch square baking pan. Distribute half the apples over the batter. Pour the remaining batter over the apples and cover with the remaining apples.

Combine topping ingredients in a small bowl; sprinkle over the apples. Bake in a preheated 350~ oven for approximately 1 1/2 hours.

Serves 8-9. You can double the recipe and bake in a 9x13 pan.

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Baklava

 

1 lb. phyllo dough (Apollo preferred)

1 stick of sweet butter

½ lb. almonds or walnuts (or a combination of the two, or green pistachios)

cinnamon

cloves

powdered sugar

2 cups sugar

1 cup water

fresh lemon juice

syrup: in a saucepan, bring to boil 2 cups of sugar, 1 cup of water, and juice from a squeezed fresh lemon. When it begins to thicken, turn off the stove and pour in rose water (optional). It gives a great aroma.

In a bowl, mix the nuts with the spices and 1 tbsp. of powder sugar. In a rectangle pan, brush the melted butter, then one by one place the phyllo brushing each one with the butter until about 8 sheets of phyllo are spread. Then put some of the mix, then 2 sheets of phyllo. Repeat until the mix is finished. Then 6 sheets of phyllo with the butter until it is over. Brush with butter and add 2 or 3 drops of water all over. Cut the baklava in small squares, and place it in a preheated oven for about 1 hour. When you take it out, place over the already prepared cool syrup. Good Luck!

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Chocolate Almond Torte With Strawberry

 

Preheat oven to 300.

1 1/4 cup sugar

1 cup margarine, softened

4 eggs, separated

2 1/4 cups almonds, sliced, blanched

7 oz. unsweetened chocolate

Sauce:

2 cups strawberries, frozen, unsweetened

1 cup sugar

Line the bottom of a 9 inch springform pan with wax paper; grease paper.

With blender, mix sugar and margarine until fluffy. Add egg yolks. In a food processor, process almonds and chocolate until finely ground. Stir into sugar mixture.

In a separate bowl, beat egg whites to stiff peaks. Mix 1/3 whites into batter. Gently fold in remaining whites. Spread batter into pan, smoothing top. Bake about 1 1/2 hours, until top springs back. Cool for 10 minutes before releasing.

Sauce: thaw and puree 2 cups frozen unsweetened strawberries. In small saucepan, combine 1 cup sugar and puree. Simmer 3 minutes. Cover and cool.

To Serve: place sauce on plate. Place torte on top. Garnish with fresh strawberries.

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Chocolate Berry Nut Tart

 

1 1/4 Cup ground walnuts

1/c ground pecans

3 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

1/3 cup sugar

semi-sweet chocolate

strawberries or raspberries

Make a crust using the nuts, margarine and sugar (amounts are approximate--you may need to add a little more of one ingredient or another, depending upon how sweet you want the shell, how large your pan is, etc). Press into a pie, tart or quiche pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool. Melt chocolate. Brush on bottom and sides of cooled tart crust. Arrange berries decoratively on crust before chocolate hardens. Drizzle melted chocolate over berries.

This can be served during the year, as well as Passover.

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Cake Roll

 

4 extra large eggs, separated

2/3 cup superfine granulated sugar

2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice

2 tsp. grated lemon zest (yellow part ONLY of lemon peel)

1/3 cup potato starch

1/3 cup sifted matzah cake meal

1/3 -1/2 cup confectioners' sugar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10x15 jelly roll pan and line it with parchment or waxed paper. Grease the paper.

In a large bowl of the electric mixer beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. The soft peak stage is when you lift up the beater and the tip of the peak falls over. Gradually, add 1/3 cup superfine granulated sugar and continue to beat until stiff peaks form (peaks will stand up straight). Set aside.

 In a small bowl of the mixer, beat the yolks on high until they are very light and lemony colored. It will take about 6 or 7 minutes. Gradually add the other 1/3 cup superfine sugar while continuing to beat the yolks. Slowly, add the lemon juice and the lemon zest and beat for another minute. Remove the beaters and set the bowl aside.

 Take about 1 cup of the egg whites and mix it into the yolks. Gently fold this mixture into the larger egg white bowl. Set aside.

 Sift the potato starch and the matzah cake meal two times. Gently add this to the eggs in three additions.

 Gently spread the batter on the greased pan and bake in the center of the oven for about 15 minutes or until a clean knife or cake tester comes out clean.

 Remove from the oven and let sit for about 5 minutes. Turn the cake out onto a clean dish towel. Roll it up the long way with the towel inside and refrigerate.

FILLING
1-1/8 cups sugar

3 tbsp. potato starch

1-1/8 cup cold water

3 extra large egg yolks (save whites for meringue)

grated zest from 1 large lemon

5 tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice

1-1/2 tbsp. unsalted parve margarine

 Combine the sugar and potato starch in a heavy saucepan. Add the cold water. Place on a medium heat. Beat the egg yolks slightly, and add them to the saucepan. Add the lemon zest and lemon juice. With a wire whisk, stir the mixture constantly as it heats. If it is too thick, add more hot water, one tablespoon at a time. As soon as it comes to a boil, whisk more vigorously but for only one minute. Remove from the heat and add the margarine, stirring constantly. Set aside to cool.

MERINGUE
1-1/2 tsp. potato starch

3/8 cup water

3/8 cup superfine sugar

3 egg whites

2 tsp. lemon extract

 In a small saucepan combine the potato starch with one tablespoon of the sugar and the water. Bring to a boil then lower heat and simmer until thick. Remove from heat and cool.

 Beat the egg whites in the electric mixer on high until soft peaks form. While the mixer is still beating, add the sugar spoonful by spoonful until it is all added.

 Add the potato starch mixture slowly. Add the lemon juice. Continue to beat until stiff peaks form.

ASSEMBLY
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

 Remove the cake roll from the refrigerator and unroll it so the towel is on the table. Gently spread the lemon filling over the area leaving a one-inch border empty. Roll up the cake roll, using the towel to help keep the cake even and being careful not to roll too tightly or the filling will ooze out.

 Place the roll seam side down on a jelly roll pan. Spread the meringue evenly over the cake making any design you like. Brown in the oven for 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees. Turn off the oven and let stay for 2 or 3 minutes more if the browning is not too dark. If it is dark, remove immediately. Refrigerate until serving time.

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